Rewards of a 30-Day Social Media Rehab – Kashmir Reader

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If you find yourself wasting hours on social media, you’re not alone. On average, Indian users spent 2.4 hours per day on social media, according to a survey. Globally, digital consumers spent nearly 2.5 hours per day on social media, according to the Global Web Index’s Social Media Trends 2019 report.
Social media was designed to bring humanity together, but truth be told, it has completely reduced rapport and evolved into apodictic addiction across all age groups. Here in this article, I share with you my experience with social media apps and the lessons learned from a 30 day social media detox.
From my youth, I was somewhat aware of the downsides of smartphones. It is for this reason that I only kept a cell phone with me after I passed 12th grade, in 2018. At the time, as everyone was active on social media apps like Facebook, Instagram etc., having a smartphone in hand, I couldn’t stay away. . I first created a Facebook account. Later, I didn’t limit myself to Facebook, but also became active on Instagram and Twitter.
From someone who was aware of the downsides of social media and cautious about their time, I remember how I got used to social media apps. I stuck to my phone most of the time, scrolling aimlessly through the social media feed. I started to save precious time on social media. Social media started to create a dopamine-inducing social environment around me. On such a smartphone addiction, I wrote a few lines:
The smartphone was invented for
convenience,
But the abuse made it a nuisance.
It was designed to bring humanity
together,
But instead he lowered the ratio
absolutely.
A beautiful family made up of
mom, dad and two minors,
Although in a single, detached room
like the steps of an upright,
While talking, studying, driving,
or during a walk,
Social media harass phone addicts around the clock.
Exasperated by social networks, I made a crucial decision on November 20. My exam was approaching and I was scrolling through videos on YouTube. A video appeared that explained the benefits of social media detox. The video, coupled with the pressure of the exam, prompted me to take an oath to stay away from social media for 30 days. I signed out, then uninstalled all social media apps – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter – and disabled YouTube. I handed over all the passwords for my social media accounts to Musaib, my nephew, who would manage these social media accounts for a month.
Although initially this task seemed very difficult, over the days, the way cleared for me. Detoxification began to confer its rewards and blessings. First and foremost, my propensity to sleep and wake up late, which is why my parents kept harassing me, started to change. When apart from my studies I had nothing to do at night, I went to bed early and therefore got up early in the morning.
Before social media detox, I felt like time flowed like sand from my hands. I didn’t have enough time to do things. But with rehab, hours spent on social media could now be added to study hours or spending time with family or other productive work. It reconnected me with people and increased face to face interactions. It made me happier and improved my mental well-being.
Social media detox puts you in a situation of soul-searching. In my case, during drug rehab, I contemplated that the world is a test for all and that indeed death is the ultimate reality. This thought prompted me to perform more religious acts, such as offering a prayer and reciting the Quran.
Although the 30 day detox is now over, I have decided not to log into the social media apps on my smartphone. Instead, I use the PC (personal computer) to log in only when needed. Rehab has taught me to keep my eyes on social media abuse. It allowed me to use social media like a master instead of becoming its slave. Anyone who feels addicted or obsessed with social media should go for a social media rehab. It will surely help to recover and repair itself. I urge everyone to plan a detox, perform it and reap the benefits, then thank me later.

– The writer is a law student at the University of Kashmir. He tweets to ummar_jamal







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